THINGS TO DO

THINGS TO DO

THINGS TO DO

Bruny Island Neck

Located in Bruny Island, Tasmania

03 6293 1446

Bruny Island Neck is an isthmus of land connecting north and south Bruny Island, southern Tasmania. Located 40 kilometres/25 miles from Hobart, Bruny is Tasmania's fourth largest island, accessed by a passenger/vehicle ferry from Kettering. The Neck is an important habitat for Bruny’s native wildlife, and here you’ll find the Neck Game Reserve. Boardwalks and viewing platforms enable you to observe short-tailed shearwaters and little penguins (also known as fairy penguins). You can see these remarkable birds returning to their burrows in the sand dunes at dusk—little penguins making their way up the beach in tight groups and the shearwaters gliding in from the sea. The Reserve has an interpretation board and during peak viewing times there is a Parks and Wildlife interpretation guide present at dusk. The best viewing period is during the warmer months—September to February.Timber stairs lead from the dunes to the Neck lookout, offering stunning 360 degree views. You’ll find a memorial here to the indigenous Nuenonne people who lived on Lunnawannalonna (Bruny Island) before the European settlement of Bruny. The Neck campground is just 20 metres from the beach and has several accessible, flat sites, car parking, picnic facilities and toilets.

Bruny Island Neck

Bruny Island Neck

03 6293 1446

Located in Bruny Island, Tasmania

Bruny Island Neck is an isthmus of land connecting north and south Bruny Island, southern Tasmania. Located 40 kilometres/25 miles from Hobart, Bruny is Tasmania's fourth largest island, accessed by a passenger/vehicle ferry from Kettering. The Neck is an important habitat for Bruny’s native wildlife, and here you’ll find the Neck Game Reserve. Boardwalks and viewing platforms enable you to observe short-tailed shearwaters and little penguins (also known as fairy penguins). You can see these remarkable birds returning to their burrows in the sand dunes at dusk—little penguins making their way up the beach in tight groups and the shearwaters gliding in from the sea. The Reserve has an interpretation board and during peak viewing times there is a Parks and Wildlife interpretation guide present at dusk. The best viewing period is during the warmer months—September to February.Timber stairs lead from the dunes to the Neck lookout, offering stunning 360 degree views. You’ll find a memorial here to the indigenous Nuenonne people who lived on Lunnawannalonna (Bruny Island) before the European settlement of Bruny. The Neck campground is just 20 metres from the beach and has several accessible, flat sites, car parking, picnic facilities and toilets.

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